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Messiah ending explained and what to expect in Season 2

WARNING: Huge spoiler alert for Netflix’s Messiah below! Read at your own risk.

You asked for it, so here’s the answer to your question!

What happened to the season ending of Netflix’s Messiah?

If it wasn’t obvious enough, Messiah focused on the life of Al-Masih or Payam Golshiri, played by the talented Mehdi Dehbi. Throughout the whole season, he was claimed to already be the Second Coming of Christ. Also throughout the season, many fans have posed questions about Al-Masih being the real deal or just another conman.

Unfortunately, Netflix hasn’t given us enough evidence to answer most of our big questions, but the streaming giant has been nice enough to give us a couple of clarifications in our heads. His powers have always been in question, but the final episode, “The Wages of Sin,” has shone light into his murky and unsure powers. I mean, he HAS resurrected people from the dead.

In the episode, the U.S. government targeted down the plane Al-Masih and former Mossad agent Aviram Dahan, played by Tomer Sisley, were traveling in. In that situation, anyone would’ve died, right? Wrong. Aviram, as normal as the human person, woke up in a beautiful field of flowers in the desert and proceeded to ask a kid about what happened to him.

And there it was, Al-Masih––unscathed from the big crash––resurrected him.

Personally, this was enough to tell me that the Son is back on Earth. But others are still speculative, and I understand why. The series also focused on his ungodliness, mainly found by Eva Gellar, played by Michelle Monaghan. Eva found out that Al-Masih was born on Earth, having the name Payam Golshiri, and was raised by his grandfather to become a conman so that he can survive the struggles in their village to which, yes, Al-Masih has confirmed.

Sadly, the ending really didn’t give us enough, but maybe the second season will. According to Arabic speakers, the name “Al-Masih” wasn’t as uncommon as you’d think it is. Al-Masih ad-Dajjal existed in this world and what do you know, he’s an Islamic figure known for being an Antichrist. No further evidence lead up to this, but hey, it’s a possibility for a big season 2.

In fact, we might see more of Jibril Medina, played by Sayyil El Alami, next season, as many think that he’s the TRUE Second Coming to confront the so-called Antichrist, Al-Masih. We’ve seen too much of Jibril to know that he’s also probably a superhuman being––surviving a suicide bomb and POSSIBLY also even having resurrecting powers.

We’ve yet to have our questions answered, but let’s watch out for the second season for more questions but definitely more answers.

12 Comments

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  1. I was caught up in the plot of this show immediately. It was very intriguing and mysterious. I loved it and am looking forward to more seasons.

    I also loved The Gift which has the mysterious happening in the story as we. We need second seasons of both Messiah and The Gift! Excellent stories.

  2. So did we actually SEE Payam raise two men from the dead? No. The reviewer has taken the word of a boy shown in an earlier scene to be a liar as the truth. Perhaps as with the boy allegedly shot and then healed, he’s been brought in on the con job.

  3. This is an awesome series. We need more series like this. Please add more seasons as it had me sitting on the edge of my chair every show.

  4. The boy who was late for school and lied that a lion had attacked his goat is the source for Al-Masih having resurrected the dead. Indeed, that is a notorious liar is the ONLY thing we know about this boy (other than he is a goat herder when not attending school, tardy or no). That is an odd thing to know about an otherwise bit player, but it speaks volumes as to reliability of his tale. Like all good plots, there is enough to think this is—as faux CNN reports—the greatest hoax of the millennia, and there is enough to think that maybe Al-Masih is something supernatural, be he the Messiah, the anti-Messiah. I just know that in terms of seasons, there had better be a Second Coming!

  5. I just finished viewing The Messiah TV series and can’t wait for the season 2 follow up. The story line maintained the interest and suspense, keeping multiple believable story lines.

    There are 2 criticisms:

    1- The story can be just as effective if you didn’t inject the F and GD words, plus you could draw from the young and pre teen audience if you kept those words out and the sex scenes. I really don’t know who would feel they missed an important part of the show if the sex scenes were eliminated.

    2- There are too many instances of impulsive leaving of a scene and wondering off into unknown and potentially dangerous environments. This makes the characters appear to be mentally and emotionally unstable. Your last episode where the pastor of the local church heard a news report about his messiah friend being someone who was labeled as having a messiah complex, then mentally rejecting him after seeing him walk on water a few days prior, paints the man as very emotionally unstable in his personal life and his faith. I’m sure you could have come up with a better story of a man of faith having an inner struggle trying to reconcile the miracles the messiah character performed with his traditional faith and the undercurrents of his wife rejecting the faith they both once held.

    The story line of the messiah does not cross the traditional judeo christian theological paradigm due to the messiah character not claiming any deity, only that he is the servant of God.

    • Traditional judeo christian theology does not share Jesus at all. I think you mean only Christian theology, but even then not all Christians believe Jesus is God, JW for example.

    • Whatever religion you possess, it speaks to you! The show sets forth value to those who think they believe. It brings out the hypocrisy of religious zellets. The world we live in the turmoil we experience day in and day out has given us great inside in this movie. Or so it should. Humans are selfish and always seeking ways of manipulating anything. The writers and director as all actors have done a fine job. I hope people understand the message. It is clear!

  6. Aviram isn’t Mossad, he’s Shin Bet. It’s not a major error, in fact it’s understandable, but all the same, Shin Bet is their domestic security service, much like the FBI.

  7. Whatever religion you possess, it speaks to you! The show sets forth value to those who think they believe. It brings out the hypocrisy of religious zellets. The world we live in the turmoil we experience day in and day out has given us great inside in this movie. Or so it should. Humans are selfish and always seeking ways of manipulating anything. The writers and director as all actors have done a fine job. I hope people understand the message. It is clear!

  8. Good show. Incredibly accurate portrayal in terms of how some people try to portray(aka frame … and when that fails … destroy ) individuals that are aligned with Gods plan and how nothing in this planet in those cases could bring them down.

    The answer isn’t within who he is but who and what hes against and that is where you will find the supernatural

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